Skytrain to Nowhere

Available in Paperback here

and eBook (pdf) here

Skytrain to Nowhere is an imagination driven and esoteric volume of free-form poetry. The book documents the author’s experiences, thoughts and observations while riding the skytrain at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport over the period of several weeks. Since the skytrain is only designed to transport travelers between various terminals and parking facilities at the airport, someone spending nearly 50 hours riding it purely for recreation and artistic inspirational purposes is highly unusual (to put it mildly.) Aside from occasional quirky anecdotes about various passengers, the poems mostly deal with themes of motion, the passage of time, and nostalgia. The author grapples with these issues from a retro-futurist perspective. Skytrain to Nowhere celebrates the realization that our vitality hinges on our ability to always keep moving, while recognizing we are unwilling or unable to leave some things behind on the journey.

Purchase Skytrain to Nowhere on Amazon.

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Educational Formality and Its Abundance

Obsession with provisioning and protecting children is a trend in the norms of WEIRD societies. In a certain type of person this often leads to an array of strange, inconsistent beliefs. Some complain non-stop about the adult abdication of grown-up responsibilities and simultaneously claim that a 16-year-old engaged in active sexual pursuit of an adult is by definition a victim of child molestation. Others bleat on about the dangers of what they call helicopter parenting while asserting that a mother’s decision to leave her child in a daycare for 8 hours of the 24 in a day is tantamount to a form of child abuse. One may see the concrescence of these stupidities in a recent New York Times article about the harassment of so-called neglectful mothers by public busybodies.

Kidnapping and child molestation are and always have been rare, so this obsession is new albeit no one knows when it began exactly. Likewise, genetics has long since set the record straight on the relevance of parenting to adult behaviour: it barely leaves a dent except in cases of extreme abuse or neglect. Dote on your children or not; they are who they are. Thus, the discourse on how to treat children ought not to focus on how it affects them, but rather what we know to be pragmatic and efficient for both parents and children.

Bryan Caplan argues that education is primarily about job-market signalling, hence the phenomenon of credential inflation and repeated efforts to pour more money into teaching even though it is well known to have weak long-term effects. This means that almost no one remembers much of what they are allegedly learning, and what they do remember is of little use to them in their work lives. Formal education is in actual fact useless to anyone but the mid-witted. Geniuses tend to be self-taught and already know a thousand times more than their classmates by the time they get to school, meanwhile the borderline intellectual functioning struggle through it all and come out at the end with very little signalling currency (i.e. grades).

Formal education before the age of 10 need not exist. It is glorified babysitting. I do not recall learning anything substantive in school for that period of my life, and I know no one who reports otherwise. Child care need not even exist unless the child is very young. Why not just let the kids run free? If this sounds alien and horrifying to you, please note that there are already places on this planet where children as young as 7 may perform most of the functions of daily life with no adult supervision and commute around gigantic megalopolises either alone or in troupes with other children. It requires an intelligent, high-social-capital society where crime is freakishly rare, which can be facilitated by homogeneity, embryonic selection for IQ (since IQ is linked to all things good), and deliciously brutal punishments for the disruption of public order and safety.

Another reason for the alleged necessity of early education is that a child must be socialised, which is to say interact with other children, and this speaks to the age-segregation trend of the First World. It hits high-IQ children the hardest: “He needs to learn to be with people his own age!” No one ever asks why, because no one actually knows why. Children who are adept at talking to adults are probably doing so out of frustration or boredom with other children, especially if they are bright, and it is not as if this “skill” is something they will carry with them for long – once they become adults, they (especially males) will be forbidden from socialising with children lest they be accused of child molestation.

In the days before institutional education was widespread, children socialised with other children, and adults, in their locale with no school, state, or bureaucracy sticking its nose in. Given the aforesaid prerequisites of high social capital, this is achievable to an even greater degree today. Smartphone addiction in children ought to be encouraged; it is the way of the True Aristocrat. Especially, encourage them to use it to get in touch with other children near them, on the same street or what have you, and then get on with their fun and games – no adult oversight needed. A nursery or daycare where I am from is often no more than a repurposed house in a residential area, much less fun than the setup I have described. This will make for less miserable childhoods and fewer put-upon and harassed parents, which, I think we should all agree, are good things.

The Good Guys and the Bad Guys

Renowned Wikifeet model and male tear bathhouse patron, Jessica Valenti posted a brief but lucid defense of NYTimes tech writer Sarah Jeong’s extensive history of anti-white tweets:

“Sarah Jeong is good, her haters are bad (terrible, even). It’s not difficult. I support whatever women need to do – including snarky tweets – to negotiate this racist, sexist website.”

So there you have it. Sarah Jeong is one of the good guys, and her haters (aka white people who responded harshly to her openly hostile tweets about them) are the bad guys.

Nevermind the fact that Twitter is an incredibly easy website to navigate and millions of people manage to do so without constantly expressing their hatred for white men and women. Valenti sneakily attempts to make this a “women being harassed online by men” issue when it isn’t. White women are also increasingly the target of unprovoked vitriol from the likes of intersectional identitarians like Jeong.

For her part, Jeong also misrepresented the situation in that she claimed her anti-white tweets were “counter trolling” in response to harassment she was receiving. However, she conveniently left out the fact that the “harassment” itself was in response to similar inflammatory tweets she made toward the same groups. It’s not like these trolls just randomly appeared in her mentions for no reason, simply to attack her because she’s a woman of color (barf.)

I don’t really have a problem with my co-ethnic, Jessica Valenti (a fellow Italian.) She’s one of my favorite feminists, and as the intersectional community becomes increasingly dominated by hostile non-whites, she’ll eventually find herself cast out, perceived as just another Becky the way Rose McGowan was. A temporary useful ally, soon to be pushed aside. For now though, Valenti still sees herself as one of the good guys…and so do I. After all, both sides are the same.

Anyway, if I’m being totally honest, this whole article was mostly just an excuse to post the theme song from Any Which Way You Can, which struck me as oddly relevant.

Discussing “Fast Food Fascism” on The Lost Eurasians

We discuss “fast food fascism” (a term coined by Pilleater,) and how people’s spiritual connection with corporate icons will lay the foundation for a new era of neo-paganism. We also talk about the AltRight and its identification with brands and how people have come to associate their beliefs with heroic corporate symbols. Mythologized fictional characters from video games and commercials have replaced Perseus and Jason and the Argonauts.

Hosted by Angry Shark, this episode of The Lost Eurasians also features Al Stankard, Pilleater and myself as guests. The broadcast runs for about 2 hours.

Rational Black Pill Returns

A long time had gone by, but recently I messaged this girl Lindsay and encouraged her to start making videos again. I always enjoyed her vids because I found them to be honest, substantive and independent minded. There was nothing sexy, dramatic, cutesy or seductive about these videos. It was just a girl in plain clothes spouting her opinions for 20 minutes or so.

In her own words, she “ragequit” a while back during the “thotgate controversy”(I feel retarded even saying it.) As I wrote in Skirting the Issue With Tara McCarthy and The Outer Limits of an Ideological Future, people who didn’t want to be confined in the equivalent of an ideological padded room would start eyeballing the exits.

Having worked in shitty sales and retail jobs for much of my life as a struggling writer/artist, I’m frequently reminded of how companies annoyingly push you to sell “the package deal.” In my mind, a more effective and ethical sales approach is one that builds trust, where the salesperson asks questions (often referred to as “needs analysis” or “needs assessment”) to determine the customer/client’s needs. The salesperson subsequently proposes a solution for the customer (aka pitches them products.) A successful sale is one where the customer’s needs are identified and met. However, to most of the sales managers I’ve come across, it doesn’t matter if the customer only needs one thing and has no use for a bunch of other crap you offer, companies always push for you to sell package deals, unnecessary upgrades, irrelevant features, overpriced accessories etc. Often this sort of sale results in more short term revenue for the company, but at the expense of losing the buyer’s confidence in the value of your product advice.

What does this have to do with anything? Well, clearly Lindsay was one of those people who didn’t want to sign on to the ideological package deal the AltRight presented, and so she took the knowledge she found useful and moved on. However, she is back making videos again.

I won’t get into the disagreements I have with some of the arguments in her “return video,” but she makes an excellent observation in a reply to some generic trad commenter:

“The human mind continues to grow in its ability to analyze and understand the world, and thankfully this leads to new abilities. one new ability, which I’ve noticed most people still lack, is being able to completely listen to an idea without believing it, critique it without dismissing it, and accept only the parts of it that seem to be true. this ability is demonstrated most clearly in the natural sciences, and it’s almost never witnessed in the political sciences.”

Anyway, welcome back.

Francis Nally Discusses Fast Food Nationalism

Francis Nally discusses Fast Food Nationalism (or Fast Food Fascism) on The Stark Truth. Listen Here.

Francis’ article Fast Food Fascism & It’s Esoteric Meaning

Francis’ Lexicon

The “innate fascism” lurking behind crass popular culture

The origins behind the unpop art movement and Neofolk

The Unpop theme of using pop culture imagery to depict transgressive material

How controversial icons can look “cute” next to family friendly imagery of popular culture

Shaun Partridge and Partridge Family Temple

Pop culture from the 1960’s through 1980’s

Francis’ critique of Spencer J. Quinn’s review on Counter-Currents about the new Incredibles 2 film

The Alt-Right’s use of making far-right symbols cool, while Fast-food Nationalism uncovers the “hipness” of corporate logos

Making collage art out of outdated pop culture memes and esoteric religion to make something new

The low brow art scene and the art of Ron English, Frank Kozik, Trevor Brown, and Mark Ryden

Musician David Thrussell’s ironic use of Fast Food imagery

Ralph Nader’s wisdom of how you can’t avoid advertisements in daily life

Going beyond memes and irony to create a positive vision

How a new Apocalypse Culture is replacing the Alt-Right

The intersectionality of Homonationalism, Neon-nationalism, The Alt-Left/Center, and Post Neo-Folk

The artist creating the vision vs. meta-politics

Embracing late capitalist materialism to find eternal peace and “Nirvana”

Memeing pop cultural products towards an identitarian end

The CalArts movement

Mortal Recall

For some unknown reason, I have to tell you about this one time in the mid 90s when I was playing Mortal Kombat with some black dudes at the Landmark arcade (an iconic establishment in Milwaukee which incredibly still exists.) First though, some brief background info. Playing arcade games against random people of all kinds was a common activity for teenagers and young adults at that time, as everyone my age probably remembers. When I say “all kinds,” I mean people whom you would be unlikely to associate with or have neutral interactions with under almost any other circumstances. Sometimes games had the potential to become awkwardly tense, if the person one was playing against had a bad temper or was some kind of thug/wannabe gangster. I myself had a tendency to enrage players by winning in a cheap fashion (such as doing the same move over and over.) There were a few times I nearly got my smarmy ass pummeled by Starter jacket wearing “wiggers” that didn’t take kindly to being hit with Nightwolf’s cheesy Shoulder Charge move like 5 times in a row (and having to continuously insert more quarters in the machine to subject themselves to it.) Before getting “mad online” and “rage quitting” social media was a thing, there were people who got angry about video games.

Anyway, that didn’t happen on this particular occasion, and it’s not my intention to go off on a social tangent here. There is no hidden Klostermanesque pop culture “metaphor for society” lurking in this post, unless I’m expressing it subconsciously and don’t realize it. Digression over….

So, this one fine 90’s afternoon, I was playing Mortal Kombat with a group of local young black dudes (probably all astronauts by now.) One of them looked at the screen and yelled “Sub-Zero! That nigga coooooold!”

(To get the full effect, you have to realize he pronounced “cold” like the word code,)

For some reason the quote has stuck with me ever since then, and I have never been able to forget that moment in time. Even to this day, whenever there is a slight chill in the air (by Arizona standards, which equates to about 60 degrees in winter or that shivery feeling when you’ve just stepped out of a swimming pool,) my friends and I will blurt out something along the lines of “Sub-Zero! This nigga cold.”

Of course, one can’t really get away with saying that anymore since it is 2018 and all, but I still do, and I don’t really care.