Mortal Recall

For some unknown reason, I have to tell you about this one time in the mid 90s when I was playing Mortal Kombat with some black dudes at the Landmark arcade (an iconic establishment in Milwaukee which incredibly still exists.) First though, some brief background info. Playing arcade games against random people of all kinds was a common activity for teenagers and young adults at that time, as everyone my age probably remembers. When I say “all kinds,” I mean people whom you would be unlikely to associate with or have neutral interactions with under almost any other circumstances. Sometimes games had the potential to become awkwardly tense, if the person one was playing against had a bad temper or was some kind of thug/wannabe gangster. I myself had a tendency to enrage players by winning in a cheap fashion (such as doing the same move over and over.) There were a few times I nearly got my smarmy ass pummeled by Starter jacket wearing “wiggers” that didn’t take kindly to being hit with Nightwolf’s cheesy Shoulder Charge move like 5 times in a row (and having to continuously insert more quarters in the machine to subject themselves to it.) Before getting “mad online” and “rage quitting” social media was a thing, there were people who got angry about video games.

Anyway, that didn’t happen on this particular occasion, and it’s not my intention to go off on a social tangent here. There is no hidden Klostermanesque pop culture “metaphor for society” lurking in this post, unless I’m expressing it subconsciously and don’t realize it. Digression over….

So, this one fine 90’s afternoon, I was playing Mortal Kombat with a group of local young black dudes (probably all astronauts by now.) One of them looked at the screen and yelled “Sub-Zero! That nigga coooooold!”

(To get the full effect, you have to realize he pronounced “cold” like the word code,)

For some reason the quote has stuck with me ever since then, and I have never been able to forget that moment in time. Even to this day, whenever there is a slight chill in the air (by Arizona standards, which equates to about 60 degrees in winter or that shivery feeling when you’ve just stepped out of a swimming pool,) my friends and I will blurt out something along the lines of “Sub-Zero! This nigga cold.”

Of course, one can’t really get away with saying that anymore since it is 2018 and all, but I still do, and I don’t really care.

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Richard Register Discusses “Ecocities”

Richard Register recently appeared on The Stark Truth podcast to discuss the concept of ecocities with Robert Stark. I did not appear on this episode, but Robert asked me if I had ever been to Arcosanti, since I’m from Arizona. The answer is no. I’ve never been there. It’s kind of far and an out of the way drive to get to Arcosanti from where I live. I believe my mother has been to the place once about 10 years ago when she was in town, but it was purely due to a recommendation from someone. I don’t believe she has any interest in this sort of thing.

Interview is available here

Richard Register is a theorist in ecology and urban design, the author of several books on the topic of ecologically sustainable cities, and founder and President of Ecocity World.

Topics Include:

Richard’s concept of an Ecocity
Paolo Soleri’s concept of an Arcology and his project Arcosanti in Arizona

The Ecosa Institute which is doing what Soleri intended on a smaller scale

Ancient examples of the Arcology go back to Ur in Mesopotamia and Çatalhöyük in Turkey

The city as a complex living organism

Horizontal vs. three dimensional cities

Implementing an ecocity on a large scale as an Ecotropolis

Why density is more ecologically sustainable

Ecocity Zoning

The goal of creating a car free city

The use of bridges between structures

John C. Portman’s Embarcadero Center in San Francisco which has aspects of an Arcology

Exterior glass elevators

Richard’s book Ecocity Berkeley and NIMBY imposed barriers to change in Berkeley

Opening up the creek systems in urban areas

Creating Ecocity village cores in the suburbs and how to retrofit aesthetically pleasing suburbs (ex. Santa Barbara, Marin County, and wealthy East Bay suburbs)

Reducing the foot print of cities and suburbs and opening up new land to agriculture and wilderness

Richard’s illustrations and the importance of aesthetics in urbanism

New Urbanism as a step in the right direction but too rigid in height and density

Richard’s trip to the Galapagos Islands and observations of how architecture coexists with nature

Ecocities in China

Robert’s observation that Las Vegas despite being an ecological catastrophe has many aspects of the Arcology

Robert Stark Discusses His Podcasting History

young Robert Stark

Francis Nally and Brandon Adamson join Robert Stark to discuss his podcasting history, political and cultural evolution, and where he is at now.

Podcast is available here

Topics:

The new book, The Stark Truth With Robert Stark: A Legacy 2009-2018

How for a long time Robert was known as the guy who randomly interviews people

How The Stark Truth doesn’t get the credit it deserves

The lack of substance of firebrand alt-podcasters and Youtube political celebrities

How Robert has now established his own unique “Starkian” ideology and cultural vision

New “Starkian” blog, Alt of Center | Life. Liberty. And the Pursuit of Beauty

How Robert’s novel Journey to Vapor Island helped brand the Starkian Identity

Robert’s adolescent traumas which provided inspiration for Journey to Vapor Island

How Robert’s experience growing up in LA and observations on society as a teen shaped his
basic cultural and political outlook

How Robert always had many of the same core principles but felt the need to belong and conform to a political tribe

Robert’s political phases including Libertarianism, Paleoconservatism, and Third Positionism

How ironically both Robert and Brandon started out on the right economically and moved closer to the left

How Robert is now at a point where he is entirely independent both politically and culturally

Robert’s podcasting history starting at Voice of Reason Radio, Counter-Currents Radio, and establishing his own podcast

Robert’s past interviews with political dissidents

Robert’s decision to focus the show on culture rather than politics

Brandon’s reference in the book to his trip to Las Vegas with Robert and the inspiration for Vapor Island

Is the future of the dissident sphere a Starkian, Alt-Center, Retro-Futurism?