Pinksheet Yang

A couple of months ago, when an avalanche of Yang memes seemed to appear out of nowhere, Hunter Wallace pointed out (his youtube channel has been deleted so I can’t link to it) that this wasn’t organic, and that Yang was clearly getting a “boost” from somewhere. Wallace was certainly correct about that. It was clearly a coordinated, professional op, but by whom? I have some ideas about who was directing it and what the reasons were, but it doesn’t matter. It’s all speculation. It’s also hard to tell to what extent anything that originates from places like 4chan is even real anymore, or to what extent it ever was. That wasn’t Yang’s fault though. Many of his policies were good. If nothing else, $1000 a month is $1000 a month. Nothing else mattered. Yang’s candidacy was propelled in essentially a “pump and dump” scheme, similar to those used in the seedy world of pinksheets and penny stocks promotion. With that thought, how appropriate the “pink hats” were.

None of that was Yang’s fault though. He of course made a strategic error in failing to embrace his new “supporters” and capitalize on the momentum which was gifted to him by the powers that be. Many people were disappointed by this and quickly abandoned the yacht. Part of me found it kind of admirable though that Yang insisted on being true to himself, “math” and all, rather than latch onto some fleeting, trendy meme campaign and pretend to be an obnoxious shitlord.

Yang did make some real blunders though. His first error was the idea to announce some new policy everyday (can’t remember if it was for 30 days or 60 days.) Many of these proposals seemed to have just been pulled out of his ass or a result of poor advice. Things such as “lowering the voting age to 16” were totally unnecessary and alienated a lot of potential supporters. He failed to take his own advice and “focus on the money.” His big selling point was the $1000 per month. That is all he should have been talking about with the exception of a few other common sense stances on important issues of the day to show he was a serious, well-rounded candidate. Yang’s other serious error was in his over the top pandering to SJWs and Russia conspiracy airheads. There is no way that someone as smart as Yang really buys into all that nonsense. The same criticism I applied to Trump years ago, applies to Yang. Intelligent candidates are at their best when they boldly articulate what they believe in their hearts rather than tell people they think (or have been advised) voters want to hear. Even if it seems unpopular or like a bad move politically, you have to just take the heat and press forward, confident that you will be vindicated. Lead the people where you want them to go.

Finally, I didn’t watch the debates, but from every indication, Yang’s performance was a disaster. He squandered what little airtime he received to make statements like “Russia is hacking our democracy.” Yang clearly does not understand where his potential pool of support lies. There was a niche available to him which he has been too clueless to recognize and exploit. Look, I like Yang. I wrote 3 lengthy essays and made a youtube video expressing enthusiastic (by my standards anyway) support for him. There’s still a long way to go in the election. If he’s really good at math, maybe he can learn from his mistakes like a sophisticated computer. At this point though, I don’t believe Yang has what it takes. $YANG stock has tanked. Don’t be left holding this bag.

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