Journey to Vapor Island

Having known artist Robert Stark for about two years (he is still the only person from the political edge-o-sphere that I have met in real life,) I was anxious to finally read his long awaited novel, Journey to Vapor Island. I was of course interested to see how he might creatively incorporate his many personal obsessions, social observations and utopian visions into the storyline. On these grounds, he certainly did not disappoint:

As they approach the Galleria, they drive under a giant pink neon archway which leads to a corridor lined with Roman columns and statues. Noam wonders what the location looks like at night and wants to further explore the architecture of the Galleria, but Harry explains that the entrance to the Erotic Emporium is VIP only.
Carlos jokes, “Noam, you’re still such a nerd. The only architecture I’ll be exploring is that of the male anatomy.”

Frequent listeners to his long running podcast will instantly recognize his favorite topics when they make cameo appearances in the book or manifest themselves as part of the underlying themes: architecture, city planning, neon, Alicia Silverstone, Pepe the frog, “Israeli-Aryanism,” blonde Jewish girls, aristocratic individualism, Leisure Suit Larry (I’m proud to say introduced him to this game,) Roger Blackstone, futurism, vaporwave, Sarah Michelle Gellar, new urbanism, etc.

Before I start this review, I just want to say that this book is not for anyone that is squeamish about sex, and that includes probably most people that make up the current crop of the “AltRight” (aka the SquareRight.) If you’re an uptight prude, NoFap weirdo, LARPy tradfag or just use the term “degeneracy” unironically, you will probably not enjoy this book. Then again, maybe you will pull a dark sense of humor out of your ass for a hot minute and enjoy it…but if you decide to read “Journey to Vapor Island” don’t say I didn’t warn you.

The sexual scenes in the book strike me as being akin to the “random battles” in old school Super Nintendo RPGs like Final Fantasy IV. It’s like when you’re walking across the overworld toward the next town, eager to see advance the story, and every few steps you take on the map, there is one of those annoying random battles. “Ugh, not another of these stupid Were-rats.” Even though the battles feel like tedious chores, they still serve a purpose as part of the journey, in terms of leveling up the characters and making you feel that much more accomplished when you finally reach the end of the game. So, though the sex scenes are sometimes graphic and painful to read through (they definitely don’t seem intended to be arousing,) at a certain point in the story you realize their significance as part of an overarching, satirical social commentary on contemporary society’s obsession with sex. Their presence is a reminder of how central sex is to people’s motivations, and the overall perception of status in society. Now, on to the review.

BIG SECRETS, HUGE SPOILERS AHEAD!

The story itself could probably best be described as a “not quite AltRight,” hypersexed and homoerotic (to put it mildly) adult variant of The Neverending Story. Journey to Vapor Island chronicles the misadventures of “Noam Metzembaum,” a precocious young Jewish man with a dirty mind and delusions of grandeur. Another central figure in the book (but one who never actually appears) is Roger Blackstone, a wealthy and controversial outsider political figure whose bold ideas and futuristic visions align with Noam’s. It would be easy to say that Blackstone represents a Trump-like figure, but it could just as easily be a Ross Perot or even Willy Wonka. Roger Blackstone is in the same vein as these types, but really his political theories and ideas bear very little to resemblance to Trump’s aside from the public’s hysterical perception of them being “fascist” and all the rest.

The “journey” begins with Noam as a socially inept yet intelligent student at a ghetto public school, where he is bullied and tormented by brutish minority students. He thinks so little of them, that he often refers to them in animalistic terms like “beasts.” When these minority thugs see Noam striking up a friendship with a nice black girl named Vanessa, they promptly beat him up.

Noam develops a crush on a wealthy blonde Jewish girl named Natalie Bloom while attending a bat mitzvah and convinces his mother to let him switch schools to attend the prestigious “Chadsworth Academy” (the book is peppered with these kinds of meme references) where Natalie is going to school. Noam’s mother is too poor to afford the tuition, but luckily he is able to obtain an academic scholarship. While at Chadsworth, Noam finds that the girls have no interest in him, and he once again finds himself being relentlessly humiliated and bullied, this time by the “Chads,” a group of handsome and stereotypical 80’s-style, Aryan looking jock assholes (although their dialogue often more closely resembles that of 90s wiggers.) Stark seems unaware (or doesn’t care) that this archetype is itself a bit of a Jewish film invention…stemming from ethnic insecurity and resentment. Revenge of the Nerds (by Jeff ((Buhai,)) The Legend of Billie Jean (produced by ((Rob Cohen,)) written by Mark ((Rosenthal)) and Lawrence ((Konner,)) Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Clueless (both directed by Amy ((Heckerling,)) Just One of the Guys (written by Dennis Feldman and directed by Lisa Gottlieb) and The Karate Kid (written by Robert Mark ((Kamen)) are all quintessential examples of this. I still maintain a nostalgic fondness for these films, but understanding writers’ and artists’ subconscious motivations and insecurities allows one to view their work with a cold eye and minimizes their capacity for emotional manipulation.

Noam’s humiliation by the Chads seems limitless, and he comes off as such a pathetic figure he seems irredeemable. While reading the first third of the book I often just wished Noam would just put himself out of his misery and off himself. One of the highlights of the Chadsworth portion though is the scene where they conduct a mock debate in class. Several students roleplay as candidates from various political parties, with Noam assuming the role of Roger Blackstone. What’s remarkable about this scene is the way the characters authentically argue each side. There is no straw-manning here. The participants state their case almost exactly the way they would in real life. It is impressive the way Stark manages this level of objectivity in crafting this scene.

Noam’s conflict with the Chads comes to a head (literally) when they defile the girl he is in love with at a party. Enraged, Noam actually murders and beheads several of the Chads. He then burns down the entire house. For me, this is where the book begins to get more interesting.

After a bizarre trial and a sympathetic judge (Noam had noticed a Blackstone bumper sticker on the judge’s car,) Noam only ends up being sentenced to about 15 years. The book devotes very little to the time Noam actually spends locked up. It is treated as a dreamlike, abstract blur (this time utilizing the familiar “pill” memes.)

After Noam is released, he discovers the world has changed dramatically. Roger Blackstone is now in charge and has since implemented many of his visions for society. I won’t go into detail, but let’s just say the US has become a lot more retro-futuristic and sexually open minded. Much to Noam’s surprise, Noam also discovers that he himself has become viewed as a folk hero, with many people having been inspired by his manifesto. This is another part of the social commentary. Ahead of his time, Andy Warhol once remarked that even people like Charles Manson were considered “up there” in terms of celebrity status and stardom despite their fame arising from the perpetration of gruesome and heinous crimes. We now live in a world where spree shooters like Elliot Rodger have a substantial posthumous following and live on in memes. Twenty years after Columbine, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold have their fans. Some of the fandom phenomenon is just teenagers being edgy, but the darker part is that on some level there are a great deal of people that sympathize and identify with their struggles (even if most people wouldn’t go as far as to throw a violent public temper tantrum and murder people.)

In Noam’s case, he had unquestionably genuine grievances, as he was the victim of not just basic bullying but sexual assaults and torture. Whether or not his level of retaliation was justified though is up for debate. Of course, it doesn’t take long for Noam to continue his violent acts once released. He brutally attacks an old bully he recognizes from his ghetto high school and castrates a well-known Israeli pick up artist that goes by the name of “Moosh” (hmmm I wonder who could have been the inspiration for that character.)

In any case, the story continues with Noam traveling to “Vapor Island,” where a movie is being made about his manifesto and life. Constructed by Blackstone’s company, Vapor Inc, the island is a futuristic, fantasy city with an eclectic mix of architectural styles, from Greco-Roman to Art Deco to 80’s neon. The movie about Noam’s life is being directed by Ari Meschel, a greedy and sleazy director/producer cast from the same mold of Harvey Weinstein (Stark also claims he actually did have Weinstein in mind while writing this, even before the allegations recently came out.)

As Noam explores, Noam begins to notice that everything on the island isn’t quite what it appears to be. It was at this point in the book that I began to appreciate what a work of genius “Journey to Vapor Island” is. A cohesive, overarching narrative begins to emerge in what I had initially written off as a chaotic product of Stark’s often juvenile and depraved imagination. Many of the attractions and destinations on the island turn out to be large scale business ventures, which are based upon the tragic events in Noam’s life and ideas from his journal. The shameless, opportunistic, economic exploitation and commodification of horrific crimes and personal tragedies may seem absurd in this context, but they are all too familiar. How
many films have been made and books been written about The Manson Family or the Zodiac Killer? You can buy Charles Manson coffee mugs and Elliot Rodger t-shirts. Journey to Vapor Island is stacked with plot developments that at first glance seem totally unrealistic and off the wall, yet upon closer inspection are just slightly exaggerated caricatures of genuine phenomena that can be observed all around us, in the world we live in today. This is what the book gets at, the commercialization of everything pure (or impure for that matter.) Noam is disgusted by the commercial exploitation of his journal entries and actions as a young man, which he felt came from a private and genuine place in his heart.

In a bizarre turn of events at The Erotic Emporium (my favorite scene) Noam receives a map, which he follows and eventually finds his way to meet a bizarre ancient civilization of frogmen that are secretly living beneath the island. Weird, huh?

Noam gets wind of the fact that Meschel’s plans to twist the meaning of Noam’s manifesto and completely misrepresent Noam’s actions in order to substitute Meschel’s own narrative. Noam determines that he must prevent Meschel from making the movie. After one lengthy final humiliating femdom ordeal at the hands of Meschel’s sadistic teenage daughter, everything culminates in a climactic (albeit brief) battle between the frogmen and Meschel’s security forces. The island is essentially destroyed.

I won’t give away the ending, but ultimately Noam has to decide whether to stay in a state of fantasy or return to the “real” world. Noam is told that the longer he stays in “Vapor” the more difficult it will be for him to return and function in the world. He has no idea whether his life will be as pathetic and humiliating as it was before if he returns, or whether his experiences will have improved/altered it in some way. He decides to return, and we can only speculate as to what is in store for him.

I did not expect much from Journey to Vapor Island when I began reading it, but I will say this, it is not a misleading title. I definitely felt like I had completed a journey when reading this thing, and like a classic SNES rpg game, when I finally got through it, I didn’t want the adventure to end. Journey to Vapor Island is one of the most creative, imaginative, and depraved books I’ve ever read. It is a true contemporary classic that is plugged in to all the ills and frills which make up the surreal world young people are trying (and usually failing) to navigate their way around.

Journey to Vapor Island
By Robert Stark
340 pages

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Lost in Secret Dreams

Sometimes I wonder how I ever ended up in any of these contentious political circles. Once upon a time, I was just a dude that wanted to make incomprehensible super 8 films and put out music that wouldn’t seem out of place on late 70’s / early 80’s porn soundtracks, yet here I am.

If you’re wondering why I haven’t been updating as much, it’s because I’ve been busy with a lot of creative projects. As you can imagine, being one of the leading proponents of a poorly understood and minimally existent political “movement” isn’t all that fulfilling. It pays almost nothing. What few allies you do accumulate tend only to embrace your ideas to the extent they’ve woefully misperceived them.

I occasionally roll my eyes and get a chuckle when I read nasty comments about me on other blogs as well, when they talk about what an “awful human being” I am, etc. These comments are usually (but not always) based on erroneous presumptions of what my views are, based on imaginative interpretations of things I’ve written and people’s preconceived biases used to fill in the blanks. I don’t care about being labeled an “awful human being,” especially by people who have interests and goals that diametrically conflict with mine. Having very little shame, allows for room to move forward and get things done, (however they may turn out.)

It’s tempting for me to write some kind of “FAQ” clarifying what my positions are, and maybe I will get around to it. However, given how terrible most people’s reading comprehension is, or how intellectually dishonest they are when looking to paint their ideological opponents in a negative light…I’m not sure there’s much point.

To be quite honest, I do not care about certain issues as much as I may come across in my writing. It wasn’t my idea to get involved in any kind of racial identity politics. It was imposed on me. Like others, I came to it reluctantly by simply noticing the real-time implications demographic changes and concluding that white people will have to start looking out for our collective interests the way other groups do. Most people I’ve encountered in pro-white or nationalist circles over the years have ranged from totally insufferable to outright bonkers (and those are just my friends!) with the occasional rational person few and far between (I realize the feeling is probably mutual.) Yet, here I am.

Despite having some wise and visionary people in prominent roles, the rank and file of the “AltRight” for the most part is inextricably tethered to a lot of things I don’t really have the slightest interest in (traditionalism, Christianity, Catholic aesthetics, rural agrarianism, renaissance architecture, sexual puritanism, anti-degeneracy, wild conspiracy theories.) In fact, as we speak AltRight.com has an article up recommending Julius Evola’s “Handbook For Right Wing Youth” as being “AltRight Essential” reading material. No thanks. I prefer Constantin Von Hoffmeister’s logically sound take on Evola. I actually like much of what constitutes the bogeyman of “modernity.” To the extent I have any real ideological passions they would be better classified as retro-futurism, transhumanism or even enclavism rather than full blown “white nationalism.” It just so happens that white people probably need to embrace identity politics both out of necessity for survival and for self determination in realizing any of the types of societies we would aspire to live in, (however incompatible they may all be with one another.) I certainly don’t care much about “racial purity” beyond a threshold that is useful in maintaining social capital, aesthetic preferences and collective cultural norms. I’m not sure what threshold is practical, desirable or realistic as an ideal. Over the years I’ve seen endless debates in the pro-white community over what constitutes white, and what percentage of Non-European genetics in a person is still acceptable for procreation, fornication, etc…with very little consensus having been reached. A lot of people who tend to be the most vocal enforcers often turn out to be hypocrites with more than a few anthropologically diverse skeletons in their own closet. All I know is I just don’t want to be in a scenario where I’m electorally outnumbered by or have to interact with significant numbers of people from groups which disproportionately display hostility toward my group (since non-whites have already overwhelmingly rejected the notion of an individualist or color blind society anyway.) This sounds pretty reasonable to me.

Explaining nuances and distinctions like this is essentially pointless. Any white person who expresses any reservations about multiculturalism, mass immigration or dares to roll his eyes during a mandatory diversity awareness lecture given by an abrasive jewess or sassy WOC, is going to be labeled a white supremacist / neo nazi / scum of the earth human being….even someone as depraved as me. So, here we find ourselves, blended together from the outside into an illusion of “Bad News Bears” styled 9th inning cohesion, while privately caught up in our own secret dreams.

Constantin von Hoffmeister on The Stark Truth

A few years ago I rediscovered some of Constantin von Hoffmeister’s old national futurism manifestos and essays from 2004-2006, which were gathering dust on some long forgotten webpages and forums. I found his views were in many ways similar to my own. Having grown weary of arguing with neoreactionary tradcaths and southern holy rollers, I welcomed the idea of National Futurism as a kind of secular, futuristic oriented nationalism my cohorts and I could get behind. At the very least, I thought the writings were interesting and should not be lost to the world. I asked Hoffmeister for permission to repost his old material, and he gave it to me. I created a National Futurism website to house NatFut related articles essays and books. Since then, there has been a resurgence of interest in National Futurism, with Robert Stark and others even taking it upon themselves to create a National Futurist political party in the US.

Constantin von Hoffmeister has been around the scene forever. He has always been known as an entertaining writer and eccentric figure in these dissident political circles, but in recent years has become more prominent. He runs the Eurosiberia Facebook group and recently gave a speech at the Identitarian Ideas conference in Stockholm.

Stark and I had the chance to interview Hoffmeister on a recent episode of the Stark Truth. The interview can be found here:
http://www.starktruthradio.com/?p=3913

Topics:

Constantin’s National Futurist Manifesto
How Futusim captures the Faustian Promethean nature of Western Man
Taking a materialistic over spiritual outlook toward identity
The Italian Futurist who wanted to re-create the glory of Rome in a futurist setting
The Dada movement, and Constantin’s flirtation with the concept of National Dadaism
The concept of Eurosiberia and Imperium Europa
National Bolshevism, Eurasianism, and Aleksandr Dugin
The European Migrant Crisis, and why Constantin is pessimistic about his home country Germany’s future
Why Constantin views Islamization as Europe’s primary threat, but America as a rival
How the election of Trump has improved Constantin’s view toward America
Constantin’s support for Israel and Secular Arab Nationalism as a bulwark against Radical Islam
The Cultural effects of Communism on East Germany and Eastern Europe
The Faustian Imperial Nature of Brutalist Architecture
Le Corbusier’s Plan To Overhaul Paris
Using Le Corbusier’s ideas to redevelop decaying suburbs into garden cities
The glitzy Neo-Brutalist Architecture of John C. Portman Jr, and his inspiration from the Champs-Élysées
London’s Architecture, Ernő Goldfinger’s Brutalist towers, Centre Point, and the BT Tower
The Bauhaus White City in Tel Aviv, Israel
Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-century modern
The Palace of the Soviets proposal in Moscow
The Russian Futurist movement
1970s Soviet futurism
New Arbat and Cyberpunk in Moscow
Constantin’s experience in India, and Le Corbusier’s Chandigarh, India
Constantin’s Poetry

The Other Mayans

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One of my favorite things about the 1970s is the bizarre architectural projects that were conceived and somehow greenlighted during the period. Many people now living in the “ruins” of these communities and surrounding neighborhoods are often completely oblivious to the cultural relevance of these structures and fail to muster any appreciation for the aesthetic uniqueness of the community.

Often times visiting these areas is a depressing expedition, because you might consider living there, but the property owners, tenants have no idea how chic the place could be and have never considered the idea that they are living anywhere but a mediocre dump just waiting to be torn down and replaced with some cheaply built McMansions (with brand new granite counter tops!) Another example of this would be the older Vegas casinos, like Circus Circus. To me, these are the destinations of wonder, excitement and magic…but to most people, they’re just dreary.

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Anyway, there’s this interesting 1970s Condominium complex in Scottsdale, AZ called “Maya,” that I’ve always found fascinating. Built in 1971, it’s a large condo community with Mayan themed buildings and aesthetics. While these “themes” are typically only superficially incorporated into the actual edifices, Maya developers actually went through the trouble of installing some detailed statues, pillars and miscellaneous decor, giving the grounds some minor semblance of an authentically exotic ambiance.

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As a side note, acting legend Cesar Romero (who played The Joker in the original 60’s Batman TV series) actually lived in these condos for a period of time.

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10-15 years ago this community had degenerated into a pretty seedy place. Despite being in a prime location, like many older complexes it attracted a lot of sketchy people (and still does.) However, I was pleased to see when I revisited it the other day, that the community looks to have been revived, and the buildings and grounds appear to be well maintained. Clearly some residents and owners at least see the value here and are interested in preserving this unrecognized historical “landmark.” This is the sort of cultural appropriation I can appreciate.

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Robert Stark Interviews Anatoly Karlin About his American Decade, Futurism, and Political Trends

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Robert Stark and co-host Pilleater talk to Anatoly Karlin. He blogs at The Unz Review

The interview can be found HERE.

Topics include:

Anatoly’s article at the Unz Review about his American Decade

Why Anatoly is leaving the United States and going back to Russia

How the United States is becoming more like Europe

T.R. Reid’s book The United States of Europe, where he argued that the EU was emerging as a superpower rivaling the US, but has latter been disproved

How during the Bush era Americans perceived Europeans as “Cheese Eating Surrender Moneys, but later Sarkozy became the architect of the war in Libya, and arming Syrian rebels

Another element of America’s Europeanization is the decline in social conservatism, the surge in support for gay marriage, and drug legalization

Anatoly’s political views, which are fairly socially liberal(except for rejecting political correctness, and radical feminism), economically centrist, and closest to Rabbit’s AltLeft

U.S. Millennials More Likely to Support Censoring Offensive Speech, especially among university students who are the future elites

The decline in American fertility rates toward European levels

How American politics now resembles Europe in the sense that there are five distinct blocs: Clinton democrats, Sanders socialists, Rubio/Bush etablishment conservatives, Cruz Bible-bashers, and Trump nationalists.

Anatoly’s pre election prediction article US Elections 2016: Let’s MAGA, Not War, and Trump’s support in the rust belt

Trump’s economic policies as a hybrid of supply side economics, and economic nationalism, and the similarities to Putin’s economic policies in Russia

The GINI index of income inequality

The pros and cons of economic automation, and the basic income

Transhumanism, Zoltan Istvan, and his book The Transhumanist Wager

The Bay Area where Anatoly spent most of his time in the US, and how it’s pretty much ideal, but also the most expensive macro-region of the US

California is also home to Ron Unz, Steve Sailer, as well as the “Alt Left” movement(the tiny group of thinkers combining leftist economics with HBD, sane views on gender relations, and a penchant for futurism )

The futurist scene in the Bay Area including Scott Jackisch’s Bay Area Futurists meetup, Health Extensions Salons, Mike Johnson’s Qualia Research Institute, Effective Altruism, and the “techno” faction of NRx

Mass Transit, Bay Area Rapid Transit, how older cities tend to have more integrated transit systems, and why conservatives oppose mass transit

Global Warming, Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius who discovered climate change, debunking climate change deniers, and whether it will benefit arctic regions such as Russia

Observations on other American cities including Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, Washington DC, and Pittsburgh

Anatoly’s experience ridding across the nation on Amtrak

Architecture: Skyscrapers, Brutalism, architect John Portman’s 70’s Neofuturism, and Rabbit’s ideal city based on the film Logan’s run

America’s great wilderness and National Park System

Blood, Soil and Food Courts

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MetroCenter Mall, Phoenix Arizona, 1970s

People often take it for granted that no one in cities like Phoenix could feel any connection to the local buildings because many of them are so recently constructed and thought to be from times when buildings had little to no spiritual or architectural significance other than for utilitarian commercial use or cookie cutter, tract housing.

“Would you fight and die for North Park Mall?” Richard Spencer asked jokingly (referring to a Dallas, TX shopping center that was presumably near an area where he grew up) during a recent Millennial Woes podcast titled, “The End of America.”

Well no..I wouldn’t, but mostly because I’m not from Dallas. However, I would fight and die for Paradise Valley Mall in Phoenix, not because I’m some kind of libertarian zealot or free market fanaticist (if anything I’m closer to a crypto-communist) but because the building and surrounding area was an integral part of my childhood and teenage experience. Admittedly, I grew up around the eastern side of town. Other 80’s kids on the west side would have spent their youth cavorting around iconic Metro Center mall (one of the film locations of Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure.) MetroCenter was the vastly superior establishment before it became overwhelmed with nonwhite gangsters and wiggers in the early to mid 90’s and was too ghetto for civilized people to hang out at.)

Believe it or not and disturbing as it may seem, people who grow up here actually do feel connected to many of these local landmarks. They’re a part of our identity and culture. Humans are territorial creatures of habit, often becoming attached to familiar haunts, no matter how superficially or artificially contrived those habitats are. It isn’t the mindless consumerism of these old malls that people identify with, but their place in our hearts as social and community hubs. I have more aesthetic affinity for a 1970’s futurist Phoenix mall or swanky mid century modern dwelling than I do for any of the 17th century churches or old office buildings in the northeastern US. Those particular eras and places do nothing for me compared to the unfulfilled space age promise of mid-century modernism, and I’m not the only one, as there are a great many advocates here who attempt to preserve structures that many outsiders would reflexively deem significant.

Robert Fairburn, Architect of MetroCenter Mall
Robert Fairburn, Architect of MetroCenter Mall

Whether it was The Wanderers or Monster Kody, street gangs have always fought over what outsiders no doubt perceived to be worthless territory, in the trivialest of turf wars. Would you fight for your home? What about your neighborhood? What about your home away from home?

Some self-proclaimed photographer “activists” have managed to convince themselves that the “death of malls” signifies some kind of broader decline of American capitalism, but the reality is that these malls were simply devoured by the very machine mechanisms of capitalism that helped spawn them in the first place. They’re in fact being replaced with an even more atomized form of capitalism, consisting of online shopping and big box stores, with “social media communities” and phone app browsing replacing local shopping and social communities, taking depersonalization to a new level entirely. Instead of gloating over an illusory victory, leftists should be preserving and re-purposing these malls into the futuristic communal living and socialization centers they were originally envisioned as. You never know what you’ve got until it’s gone.

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Like Spencer, I don’t have any real attachment to the abstract values which comprise the contrived, constitutional “American” identity that conservatives fetishize and deify. And no, I probably wouldn’t actually fight and die for these local Phoenix malls, but only because they’re already ruined or nearly demolished. Much of this area is already overrun, and it’s too late. Some areas sadly have to be written off, because we just don’t have the numbers. Yet by necessity, the un-luxurious of us that remain (outnumbered) are compelled to gravitate toward a more biological identity, preserve the collective desire and genetic foundation that offers the greatest probability of creating the types of societies we wish to live in, somewhere. We’ll make a stand there. See you at the Orange Julius, Caesar!