Robert Stark talks to David Cole About LA Malls

Robert Stark and Matthew Pegas talk with David Cole about the history, culture, and aesthetics of LA ‘s Malls. David Cole writes for Takimag and is the author of Republican Party Animal.

Show is available here

Topics:

David and Robert’s background growing up on the Westside of LA
The Open Air Century City Shopping Center, the original 60’s retro futuristic aesthetics, and the film Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
The recent $1-billion makeover of the Mall and plans to make Century City more urban and pedestrian friendly
The “Westfield Aesthetic”
The old underground 70’s retro futuristic ABC Entertainment Center
The first major indoor mall Fox Hills in Culver City
The Westside Pavilion, Jon Jerde’s 80’s Post Modernist aesthetics (original featured in Tom Petty’s Free Fallin’), and plans to turn it into office space
The 80’s Rodeo Collection, an archeo-futuristic urban oasis model for self-contained cities, and the film Body Double
The Beverly Center, the amusement park “Kiddyland” before the mall , the original 80’s aesthetics with futuristic external escalators, and later renovations
The lack of interest in preserving 80’s architecture
Young people’s interest in 80’s aesthetics and the magical dream like memories from early childhood (Hypnagogia)
The 70’s retro high-rise Mr. C Hotel(formerly the Renaissance) near Beverly Hills
The Third Street Promenade, the first major outdoor mall
The rise of outdoor malls such as Rick Caruso’s The Grove and Americana at Brand and how those are now becoming dated
Future trends, the under construction high-rise shopping complex, the Oceanwide Plaza in Downtown LA
The Jon Jerde designed neon lit Universal CityWalk
David’s joke about the City Walk’s old Rain Forest Cafe and the Museum of Tolerance’s Tunnel of Hate
Westwood Village as the center of Westside nightlife and it’s decline in the late 80’s

Advertisements

Postcards From New Suburbia II

Greetings. So, admittedly I haven’t been writing as many articles lately, and there are good reasons…The most important being that I’m working on yet another book, one that is sure to be perceived as the most bizarre, inaccessible and random writing project I’ve ever completed (which is really saying something if you’ve been following me since my days of writing Garbage Pail Kids fanfiction in the 80s.) The deep meditative state required for me to write this new book doesn’t leave time for a lot of abrasive political writing. I wish I had a healthy backbench of stable writers on this site, but the few contributors this site has are saddled their own lively limitations, so this is pretty much the pulse of the party. People contribute when they can, and that’s better than nothing. Sometimes new people want to write for the site, but they are so fuckin crazy that I just have to ignore them

The other reason is that I’ve been doing a lot more paid writing jobs lately. In the interest of my immediate survival, paid writing gigs must take precedence over confrontational political writing that serves only to make me more unliked than I already am. I do however have a couple of articles which are about 3/4 completed, but I have been too lazy to finish them. I also have endless ideas for new political articles, which I would love to start, but there is just never enough time! I need to hire someone to ghost write them for me. There is never enough time……

Majestic Burger King

Unpopular Opinion: Burger King is superior to In-N-Out Burger. In-N-Out’s Double double pales in comparison to a flame broiled Whopper. I only wish that BK would bring back the original Chicken Tenders formula from the 80s. Anyway, enjoy this retro Burger King location, which appears to be relatively unmolested by time. The clueless “updater” busybodies and ruinous remake enthusiasts haven’t got their grubby little paws on it…yet.

Educational Formality and Its Abundance

Obsession with provisioning and protecting children is a trend in the norms of WEIRD societies. In a certain type of person this often leads to an array of strange, inconsistent beliefs. Some complain non-stop about the adult abdication of grown-up responsibilities and simultaneously claim that a 16-year-old engaged in active sexual pursuit of an adult is by definition a victim of child molestation. Others bleat on about the dangers of what they call helicopter parenting while asserting that a mother’s decision to leave her child in a daycare for 8 hours of the 24 in a day is tantamount to a form of child abuse. One may see the concrescence of these stupidities in a recent New York Times article about the harassment of so-called neglectful mothers by public busybodies.

Kidnapping and child molestation are and always have been rare, so this obsession is new albeit no one knows when it began exactly. Likewise, genetics has long since set the record straight on the relevance of parenting to adult behaviour: it barely leaves a dent except in cases of extreme abuse or neglect. Dote on your children or not; they are who they are. Thus, the discourse on how to treat children ought not to focus on how it affects them, but rather what we know to be pragmatic and efficient for both parents and children.

Bryan Caplan argues that education is primarily about job-market signalling, hence the phenomenon of credential inflation and repeated efforts to pour more money into teaching even though it is well known to have weak long-term effects. This means that almost no one remembers much of what they are allegedly learning, and what they do remember is of little use to them in their work lives. Formal education is in actual fact useless to anyone but the mid-witted. Geniuses tend to be self-taught and already know a thousand times more than their classmates by the time they get to school, meanwhile the borderline intellectual functioning struggle through it all and come out at the end with very little signalling currency (i.e. grades).

Formal education before the age of 10 need not exist. It is glorified babysitting. I do not recall learning anything substantive in school for that period of my life, and I know no one who reports otherwise. Child care need not even exist unless the child is very young. Why not just let the kids run free? If this sounds alien and horrifying to you, please note that there are already places on this planet where children as young as 7 may perform most of the functions of daily life with no adult supervision and commute around gigantic megalopolises either alone or in troupes with other children. It requires an intelligent, high-social-capital society where crime is freakishly rare, which can be facilitated by homogeneity, embryonic selection for IQ (since IQ is linked to all things good), and deliciously brutal punishments for the disruption of public order and safety.

Another reason for the alleged necessity of early education is that a child must be socialised, which is to say interact with other children, and this speaks to the age-segregation trend of the First World. It hits high-IQ children the hardest: “He needs to learn to be with people his own age!” No one ever asks why, because no one actually knows why. Children who are adept at talking to adults are probably doing so out of frustration or boredom with other children, especially if they are bright, and it is not as if this “skill” is something they will carry with them for long – once they become adults, they (especially males) will be forbidden from socialising with children lest they be accused of child molestation.

In the days before institutional education was widespread, children socialised with other children, and adults, in their locale with no school, state, or bureaucracy sticking its nose in. Given the aforesaid prerequisites of high social capital, this is achievable to an even greater degree today. Smartphone addiction in children ought to be encouraged; it is the way of the True Aristocrat. Especially, encourage them to use it to get in touch with other children near them, on the same street or what have you, and then get on with their fun and games – no adult oversight needed. A nursery or daycare where I am from is often no more than a repurposed house in a residential area, much less fun than the setup I have described. This will make for less miserable childhoods and fewer put-upon and harassed parents, which, I think we should all agree, are good things.

Discussing “Fast Food Fascism” on The Lost Eurasians

We discuss “fast food fascism” (a term coined by Pilleater,) and how people’s spiritual connection with corporate icons will lay the foundation for a new era of neo-paganism. We also talk about the AltRight and its identification with brands and how people have come to associate their beliefs with heroic corporate symbols. Mythologized fictional characters from video games and commercials have replaced Perseus and Jason and the Argonauts.

Hosted by Angry Shark, this episode of The Lost Eurasians also features Al Stankard, Pilleater and myself as guests. The broadcast runs for about 2 hours.

Francis Nally Discusses Fast Food Nationalism

Francis Nally discusses Fast Food Nationalism (or Fast Food Fascism) on The Stark Truth. Listen Here.

Francis’ article Fast Food Fascism & It’s Esoteric Meaning

Francis’ Lexicon

The “innate fascism” lurking behind crass popular culture

The origins behind the unpop art movement and Neofolk

The Unpop theme of using pop culture imagery to depict transgressive material

How controversial icons can look “cute” next to family friendly imagery of popular culture

Shaun Partridge and Partridge Family Temple

Pop culture from the 1960’s through 1980’s

Francis’ critique of Spencer J. Quinn’s review on Counter-Currents about the new Incredibles 2 film

The Alt-Right’s use of making far-right symbols cool, while Fast-food Nationalism uncovers the “hipness” of corporate logos

Making collage art out of outdated pop culture memes and esoteric religion to make something new

The low brow art scene and the art of Ron English, Frank Kozik, Trevor Brown, and Mark Ryden

Musician David Thrussell’s ironic use of Fast Food imagery

Ralph Nader’s wisdom of how you can’t avoid advertisements in daily life

Going beyond memes and irony to create a positive vision

How a new Apocalypse Culture is replacing the Alt-Right

The intersectionality of Homonationalism, Neon-nationalism, The Alt-Left/Center, and Post Neo-Folk

The artist creating the vision vs. meta-politics

Embracing late capitalist materialism to find eternal peace and “Nirvana”

Memeing pop cultural products towards an identitarian end

The CalArts movement