Robert Stark Talks to Ashley Messinger About Retro Futurism ( Part II)

Robert Stark and co-host Brandon Adamson talk to returning guest Ashley Messinger. Ashley is based in the UK and writes for Brandon’s You can also find Ashley on Twitter.

Interview can be found here.

Topics Include:

A continuation on the topic of a “Redpilled” SWPL culture and it’s viability
The implicit Whiteness of progressive causes such as Environmentalism, Effective Altruism, and Transhumanism
The importance of being technologically advanced in contrast to gun culture and “Becoming a Barbarian”
Creating City States based on shared interest
Biopunk, Biomorphism, and vertical gardens
Brandon’s interest in 70’s Retro Futurism (ex. Logan’s Run)
Steampunk, Urban fantasy literature, and the technology of Victorian England
Decopunk; the film Dark City
The lack of vision in new architecture and urbanism
Roman Archeo Futurism
80’s Retro-Futurism, Cyberpunk, and Fashwave
The Bearer of “Trad” News
Hip to the Moon: Brandon Adamson Drops Out to Conquer the Stars
Robert’s Journey to Vapor Island; Roger Blackstone’s “Neon Nationalism”
The Man in the High Castle series; the alternative society portrayed and the Retro-Futuristic architecture
Whether Fascism was anti-modern or about creating an alternative modernity
Ashley’s review of the film Call Me by Your Name
Age of Consent Laws
The film The Crush Starring Alicia Silverstone


Interview With Ashley Messinger on The Stark Truth (Part I)

Robert Stark and co-host Brandon Adamson talk to ASHLEY MESSINGER. Ashley is based in the UK and writes for Brandon’s site, You can also follow Ashley on Twitter. The interview can be found here.

Topics Include:

Why Brandon’s moniker is now “The Left of the AltRight”
Ashley’s political evolution to the Alt Left (Left Wing of the Alt-Right)
Ashley’s disillusionment with the Alt-Right
The immigration and demographic situation in the UK
Radical Islam, the Charlie Hebdo Massacre, and the Rotherham scandal
The ineptitude of Right Wing politics in the UK
Ashley’s preference for SWPL cultural amenities
Whether there is a large enough demographic for a “Red Pilled” SWPL movement
Misconceptions about English culture
The Thacherite Neo-Liberal de-industrialization of the UK
Ashley’s support for a secular form of Distributism
Luck egalitarianism
The Signalling Model of Education
Automation and the Basic Income
The Techno Futurist faction of Neo-Reaction
Effective Altruism
Ashley’s article The Push to Normalize Polonophilia

Discussing Journey to Vapor Island on The Stark Truth

We discussed Robert Stark’s new novel, “Journey to Vapor Island” on The Stark Truth podcast.

Show is available here.


Brandon’s review of Journey to Vapor Island (Contains Spoilers)
-The cover art by Mark Velard
-How listeners to the show will instantly recognize favorite topics when they make cameo appearances in the book or manifest themselves as part of the underlying themes
-Internet memes in the book (ex. the men in the frog masks)
-A disclaimer that this book is not for anyone that is squeamish about sex or easily shocked or offended
-Brandon’s observation that the sexual scenes in the book are more akin to the “random battles” in old school Super Nintendo RPGs like Final Fantasy IV
-The theme of how central sex is to people’s motivations, and the overall perception of status in society
-The main character Noam Metzenbaum who is a socially inept yet intelligent student with delusions of grandeur
-The Chads and the theme of the nerd getting revenge against bullies and the popular cliques
-Noam’s crush Natalie Bloom and his lifelong obsession for her
-The Retro-Futuristic surreal fantasy world in the book; an adult Never Ending Story
-The Roger Blackstone character who could represent a Trump-like figure, but could just as easily be a Ross Perot or even Willy Wonka
-The outrageous comic elements in the book
-The theme of the commercialization of tragedies and the celebrity status of mass murderers
-How the book is timely with the ongoing Hollywood sex scandals
-The theme of living in ones fantasies and being disconnected from reality

Interview With Anthony Hamilton on The Stark Truth

I first heard about Anthony Hamilton when I stumbled onto one of his videos a couple years ago called, “Secret to Time Travel: Your Mind as a Time Machine.” I’ve been intrigued by the idea of mental time travel ever since seeing the film, “Somewhere in Time” back on TNT’s Monstervision (which included some memorably hilarious, biting commentary from host, Joe Bob Briggs about the film) back in 1999.

Anyway, while on the surface Anthony Hamilton seems like another self-help marketing guru and motivational seminar speaker type, he actually incorporates a rather bizarre and interesting theory on time travel into his advice. He posits the idea that when you think about events in the past and the future, your mind actually connects to that place and time, much like computers connecting to websites on the internet.

“The new model of the mind that neuro-scientists are using now to understand consciousness, is that the mind is really a kind of time machine, that has the ability to gather information from the past, gather information from the future and to use this information, and this is in fact what thinking is, now traditionally we have this view of time that says that there is the past, present and the future and Newton in his writings talked about a river; a time like a river that flows from the past into the future, but Einstein in 1904 with his theory of relativity was written described time as the field.
Now the difference between a river and the field, a river carries things along with it , with the field you can move around in it like a field of gravity.”

I’m of course somewhat skeptical of this theory, as I think the mind acts as a kind of computer simulator that attempts to create simulations and recreate scenarios, attempting to calculate how they could possibly or potentially play out. Hamilton does make a great point about memories though, and how they’re much more complex than the mere “recordings” most people think of them as being.

..if you remember some situation that happened to you for example maybe you are attending a party sometime in the past you can remember that party as though you were remembering it from your own perspective or you can remember it as though you’re looking down on it from 10 to 15 feet above where you can remember, so you’re fifty feet away from it watching it like a movie, so the fact that you’re memory is flexible like this indicates what’s going on something different that simply playing a recording,

I would be curious to know more about his sources or the studies he references for these ideas on “future memory” and the mind as a sort of time machine, which he discusses briefly in the interview with Stark. You can also check out Hamilton’s book, Mind, Time and Power.

Click here to listen.

Topics include:

Background in linguistics; linguistics as a cognitive science
The unconscious thought process and how to better utilize it
The Functional MRI
Neuroplasticity; the science of changing the mind
The Law of Attraction
Mental Time Travel
Future Memory
Quantum Consciousness
Dealing with past traumas, fears, and negative thoughts
Goal setting and successfully utilizing future memory
Meditation and mindfulness

Discussing AltLeft Chaos Magic on The Stark Truth

Robert Stark and co-host Sam Kevorkian talk to Brandon Adamson. Brandon blogs at, is the author of Beatnik Fascism, and has a Youtube channel, Self Checkout.

The entire podcast can be found here.


-Brandon’s Official Response to Trump’s Remarks on the AltLeft
-The context of Trump using the term “Alt-Left” to describe the antifa as opposed to the original Alt Left
-The media’s references to Brandon’s Alt Left site and how the only semi accurate one was The Week’s article (since the time when this podcast was recorded there was another accurate article which appeared in Salon)
-Confusing political news junkies with esoteric and outlandish cultural references
-The “Orange Pill”
-How the less aggro elements of the Left and the Alt-Right should combine forces for single payer health care, student debt relief, and the dismantling the College Football Industrial Complex
-How massive online censorship is forcing people to build an alternative tech universe
-Corporations enforcing a uniform culture of consensus among workers
-Companies policing employees behavior outside of work
-Why a 6 hour work day would be more efficient
People Don’t Think Universal Basic Income Be Like It Is but It Do
New Suburbanism

People Don’t Think Universal Basic Income Be Like It Is but It Do

Zoltan Istvan was on The Stark Truth to discuss his plan for a California State Basic Income (to be paid for by developing and monetizing federal land.) While I like Zoltan and think he probably would have been the best choice in the last presidential election (among the candidates running,) it goes without saying that I think this is a terrible idea. Not that I oppose the idea of a basic income. I am sympathetic to UBI generally, but I oppose this particular scheme for the following reasons:

1. It would be a shame to see any more of California’s beautiful land be ruined by commercial development. Many people believe that much of what has been developed already has been a mistake. What are they going to develop anyway? More social media ad agencies, useless phone app startups and overpriced McModern apartments? Zoltan’s argument for why this all would be bad for the environment is a bizarre stipulation that the “land would be leased not sold and would have to be returned to it’s previous condition or better after the lease.” This might sound nice but makes very little practical sense. This isn’t going to be like when the Black Fortress disappears without a trace in Krull. If a company leases the land and later goes bankrupt or fails in some way, they’re not going to have the money to demolish all of their buildings and magically regenerate a fully mature forest overnight. This just isn’t realistic. It will be bad for the environment. The increased developments will require more natural resources to sustain, resources which California struggles to harness a sufficient amount of, even now.

2. California doesn’t even care to enforce borders of any kind currently. Most of the larger metropolitan hubs are basically sanctuary cities. A “basic income” can only be mathematically viable if strict population controls are kept on the number of of people residing in that particular area. It requires draconian measures like breeding restrictions and militarily enforced boundaries. Merely having strict residency requirements in order to qualify isn’t enough, because pretty much anyone who lives there can vote. Massive amounts of people who live in California but wouldn’t qualify, can still elect officials that will assert their electoral power to loosen requirements, cut deals or file legal challenges based on trumped up charges of discrimination, etc. Developing and leasing millions of acres of federal land might provide some limited revenue for a basic income, if we were dealing with a stagnant population, frozen in time at current levels. More than likely though, increased development will lead to more people flocking to the area for tech jobs and housing, more Indian programmers and wealthy foreign investors finagling their way here for jobs and real estate investment opportunities. A bigger pie but minimal to no increase in the size of the average slice. Basically, nothing leftover for a basic income.

3. California has frequently struggled with budget deficits in the past. If the projected revenues to fund the California universal basic income do not materialize through this land leasing scheme, the people who are expecting the money will be pissed. Which do you think is more likely, that politicians up for election will spend the state into massive deficits to attempt to deliver people the basic income they were promised, or that they will tell millions of voters “Oops sorry, looks like we can’t afford to give you each 25k a year after all” and face the wrath of betrayed angry mobs. Both of those gloomy scenarios seem highly plausible if this plan were to ever move forward. Those left to foot the bill for this tab will likely flee the area in droves.

4. There is a little too much Utopian optimism with this idea. It kind of reminds me of when you see stoners arguing that legalizing weed will solve nearly every social, economic and military problem in the world “just think, we could tax it, and it would pay off the national debt!” This strikes me as similar, wishful, pie in the sky thinking. There are just too many variables and wildcards involved here.

So anyway, everyone’s a critic right? After reading all that you might be thinking, “Okay, well what is your plan for universal basic income then?” My plan is extremely simple. You form a secluded micro state with a very tiny population and heavily fortify it. This microstate earns revenue through some kind of shared natural resource or industry (could be anything from genetically engineered crops to rubber band manufacturing to Scientology auditing classes.) People would receive a meager basic income by working in civil or community service. Pretty simple but only has a chance of working with a delicate population balance which must be maintained and understood by all participants. I have no clue whether my plan could be viable in practice (for one thing, people would have to actually be interested in my ideas.) That’s the rub with radical futurism. In our grand visions of the future, we often lose sight of the fact that we’re stuck dealing with people the way they are and the world the way it is.

Brandon Adamson is the author of Beatnik Fascism