Emily Ratajkowski’s Modest Proposal

In response to Alabama’s recent, controversial, abortion legislation, model and former Blurred Lines music video star, Emily Ratajkowski, posed nude on Instagram, bemoaning how the bill would “perpetuate the industrial prison complex by preventing women of low economic opportunity the right to choose to not reproduce,” and further how: “the states trying to ban abortion are the states that have the highest proportions of black women living there.” Ratajkowski, a sex-positive feminist, was obviously blind to her implicit appeal to eugenics, but Breitbart journalist John Nolte jumped at the opportunity to push the recently-popular narrative that “Democrats are the real racists,” going so far as to claim that “Ratajkowski Believes Killing Black Babies Is a Public Service”, and accusing her of white-supremacy, even comparing her comment to “anything you would read at ‘The Daily Stormer’”. In fact, Ratajkowski’s sentiments are neither as “woke” as she’d like to think, or as fascist as Nolte would like to accuse her of but reflect a kind of pragmatism taboo to both the mainstream left and the mainstream right: an overlooked meeting point between humanitarian concerns and elitist/conservative-minded population control.

The relationship between legalized abortion and falling crime rates has, in fact, been well studied, with results pointing to the not-at-all surprising notion that requiring every pregnancy to go to term, no matter how unwanted or inauspicious, may not actually be great for society. Many scholars cite Roe V. Wade as the prime culprit in the staggering, American, crime-drop of the 1990’s, for example. The demographic angle on this truth is touchier but also founded in reality. Blacks are disproportionately likely to be affected by those conditions which lead to poverty and crime, and sure enough, the most recent data shows them representing 54% of those incarcerated in Alabama despite representing just 26% of the population, and this still after comprising a majority of the aborted pregnancies in the state (62% in 2017). Ratajkowski’s point is basically that we as a society are churning out large numbers of people who are predestined by sociocultural conditions and the prison industrial complex to live miserable lives, and that this is especially obvious in a state like Alabama. It’s hard to imagine that inviting the number of single, black, Alabaman mothers to skyrocket—as does the state’s new abortion bill—wont perpetuate increases in poverty, general unrest, and higher incarceration rates in Alabama’s awful prisons (the deadliest in the country). Certainly, this outcome seems more likely than “one of those black babies” emerging from one of the worst public school systems in the country to “cure cancer” as John Nolte chides us.

It would seem that promoting absolute control over reproduction to those members of society most affected by adversity would be something that both humanitarians of the left, and those concerned with conserving social order and demographics on the right should find common ground on—but such agreement is far from sight.

As exemplified by the Nolte article, the right is utterly delusional on this point: willing only to make moralistic arguments against abortion, and as a result unwilling to engage with any arguments for it no matter how pragmatic. Allergic to coupling their opposition to abortion with any reasonable plans to increase the social welfare of those most likely to seek it out, the pro-life GOP must rely on the myth that anyone can lead a good and productive life if only they pick themselves up by their bootstraps. As usual, their exaggerated focus on the individual and personal responsibility makes them blind to dynamics that can only be grasped on a larger scale. The pro-life movement is part the same principles-based conservative tradition that supports starting foreign wars in order to spread “freedom and democracy” worldwide. It riles up a certain, obnoxious, segment of the population but its big-picture, long-term, effects are disastrous and tend to have the very opposite effect of “conserving” anything. “Never mind all the refugees! Never mind all the unwanted children! Freedom and democracy are absolute ends in themselves, and abortion is murder!” In this sense, the pro-life victory in Alabama must be viewed in the same vein as so many other “accomplishments” of the Trump era: rather than moving conservatism toward something more nationalistic and pragmatic—as promised and as is necessary—Trump has come to embody the last desperate gasp of boomer Conservative talking points.

The left occasionally makes valid points about abortion but no longer connects them with any broader program for maintaining a healthy, cohesive society. Rather, the pro-choice movement is now packaged with disastrous policies like laissez-faire immigration, support for the reproduction-incentivizing welfare state, and, increasingly, a general devotion to demographic change and cultural dissolution. And yet, occasionally someone like Ratajkowski comes along and says something on the abortion issue that makes one grow nostalgic for the more sensible tone of the early 20th century progressive era.

There is, of course, a precedent for talking about the eugenics of birth control and the historical figure who best represents these ideas is none other than progressive era figurehead and Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger. Pro-lifers love to talk about how Sanger was pro-eugenics and therefore basically Hitler. Many of them would be surprised to learn that Sanger was in fact anti-abortion and simply a radical proponent of contraception. She was indeed pro-eugenics but wasn’t a mere social Darwinist. For Sanger, eugenics and a humanitarian concern for the poor went hand-in-hand. Not only would birth-control reduce the population of an underclass whose high fertility rates had a demonstrably negative impact on society, but also it could improve that class’s standard of living. Just as critics of immigration accurately point out that immigration has a negative impact on the citizens of a country who must compete with new arrivals for jobs, Sanger argued that promoting birth control to adversely affected communities would empower them to advance. That such a promotion of birth control would also have a eugenic effect was simply another, complementary benefit. Her biggest crime, it seems, was to question the idea that all lives are necessarily good and valuable things—a cardinal offense in a mass-democratic society.

The fact is, it’s easier to virtue signal against eugenics than to provide the underclass a decent life. Leave it to the irrational banter of the culture wars to prevent us from having a more productive conversation about reproductive rights.

Advertisements

The Chavs Are Not Listening

Many self-identified antinatalists adhere to some form of negative utilitarianism and are convinced that their not having children will reduce the net suffering of the world. Let us set aside the thorny question of whether beliefs have non-trivial causal efficacy independent of genes – which I doubt (<< skip to table 3). Who, prima facie, finds these ideas attractive?

Socially liberal, virtue-signalling (I use that phrase descriptively, not pejoratively), high-IQ persons of northern European descent who enjoy burying their heads in esoteric thought. In other words, the group who are most interested in, and most likely to, improve the lot of the living world. Any suffering that might await the children of these people is nothing compared with the Third World, nothing compared with what lies behind us, and with what may yet lie ahead. What will their beliefs do to arrest current population trends, such as Africa’s population boom, which is certain to engender much suffering? Can we market antinatalism to Africans – in a profoundly, brilliantly, orgiastically non-racist way?

That these problems do not occur to otherwise intelligent and well-informed people tells you a lot about how important keeping up appearances is as a human motivation, even or perhaps especially in “rationalist” circles: what matters is whether the ideas sound coherent to others in your social group, not whether they take account of reality as is.

If there is one thing that the cognitive elite of the West could really do with keeping in mind, whatever else happens, it is this:

The chavs are not listening.

The Lighter Side of the Black Pill

“when you leave a cookie in the oven too long” – @idiot_ teen

Politics is retarded. Only powerful crystals can save us. The attempt at persuasion of people is mostly pointless. You can articulate your position expertly, easily refuting the same flimsy arguments and pathetic clichés you’ve heard a thousand times. Meanwhile, transracial pop star Ariana Grande tweets nothing but “goo goo gaga” baby talk all day long and has 59 million loyal followers. Perhaps you believe that by mastering the language of “goo goo gaga” baby talk, you can enlist and mobilize 60 million empty vessels toward the project of securing your fleeting geopolitical ends. Wouldn’t it be just as fruitful to purchase a packet of sea monkeys and appoint yourself their supreme overlord? Before you start thinking about how you’re going to “save” Western civilization with your based dwarven fash army, have a look around. Half your office is probably already filled with Indian programmers who’ve never even seen an episode of 90210. Most people can’t even handle the level of civilization required to adhere to the assigned parking spaces map in a typical suburban apartment complex. Whatever remains of the prospect of any meaningful nationalism (in the US at least) has already been ruined by mathematically challenged, short sighted, Neo-Quaylist, “family values” tradfag retreads like….well I won’t name any names because there’s no point. They’ll never get it. In fact, if by some miracle these wacktivists are successful in reclaiming or “saving” anything, the resulting society will likely be a place equally or less desirable to live in than what would exist otherwise. In other words, they’re offering at best a zero sum outcome, like Tic Tac Toe. There is no viable electoral pathway toward overcoming the legislative and judicial obstacles standing in the way of restoring or even maintaining a nation-state that would exist in any recognizable form other than name only. Why throw your support behind politicians and “thought” leaders that don’t have your back and don’t even share your goals. Why make common cause with people who aren’t on remotely the same page as each other and who may not even understand what your core beliefs are? Why aspire to become some Mr Potato-Head barbarian when you can immortalize yourself in the world of Melrose Place fanfiction?

Above all else, whenever you start lapsing into romantic idealizations of humanity, it’s important to remember that people are pests. To quote Uncle Charlie in Shadow of a Doubt:

You go through your ordinary little day and at night you sleep your untroubled, ordinary little sleep filled with peaceful, stupid dreams. And I brought you nightmares! Or did I, or was it a silly inexpert little lie. You live in a dream. You’re a sleepwalker, blind. How do you know what the world is like? Do you know the world is a foul sty? Do you know if you rip the fronts off houses you’d find swine? The world’s a hell. What does it matter what happens in it? Wake up, Charlie! Use your wits. Learn something.

The only way forward is to check out and ascend into the ether, carving out a portably permeative, floating couch cushion fort existence somewhere over the heads of the tot bots …and through the place which can only be reached by those with the capacity to detect its presence.

Francis Nally Discusses Fast Food Nationalism

Francis Nally discusses Fast Food Nationalism (or Fast Food Fascism) on The Stark Truth. Listen Here.

Francis’ article Fast Food Fascism & It’s Esoteric Meaning

Francis’ Lexicon

The “innate fascism” lurking behind crass popular culture

The origins behind the unpop art movement and Neofolk

The Unpop theme of using pop culture imagery to depict transgressive material

How controversial icons can look “cute” next to family friendly imagery of popular culture

Shaun Partridge and Partridge Family Temple

Pop culture from the 1960’s through 1980’s

Francis’ critique of Spencer J. Quinn’s review on Counter-Currents about the new Incredibles 2 film

The Alt-Right’s use of making far-right symbols cool, while Fast-food Nationalism uncovers the “hipness” of corporate logos

Making collage art out of outdated pop culture memes and esoteric religion to make something new

The low brow art scene and the art of Ron English, Frank Kozik, Trevor Brown, and Mark Ryden

Musician David Thrussell’s ironic use of Fast Food imagery

Ralph Nader’s wisdom of how you can’t avoid advertisements in daily life

Going beyond memes and irony to create a positive vision

How a new Apocalypse Culture is replacing the Alt-Right

The intersectionality of Homonationalism, Neon-nationalism, The Alt-Left/Center, and Post Neo-Folk

The artist creating the vision vs. meta-politics

Embracing late capitalist materialism to find eternal peace and “Nirvana”

Memeing pop cultural products towards an identitarian end

The CalArts movement

The Stark Truth: Discussing The AltRight Implosion

Podcast is available here

Topics:

How the Alt-Right is imploding and splitting into factions
The incident with Matthew Heimbach and the disbanding of the Traditionalist Workers Party
The never ending hypocrisy of preachy Traditionalists
The implausibility of success for those re-branding as American Nationalists
The parallel SJW culture in the Alt-Right that has developed in terms of being shamed into having to publicly disavow and distance yourself from people you have disagreements with
The Class Divide on the Alt-Right
Vanguardism vs. Populism
The importance of building Alternative Institutions
How we made the right decision to move in our own directions a few years ago when we saw where the train was headed
The future of all these movements
How anonymity has largely outlived its usefulness
European Identitarianism
The Balkanization of the US; secessionist movements vs retaking America as a whole
How Trump won with economic populism and social centrism but is now basically a mainstream Republican
The Scapegoat Generation – A Half-Hearted Defense of Boomers