Pinksheet Yang

A couple of months ago, when an avalanche of Yang memes seemed to appear out of nowhere, Hunter Wallace pointed out (his youtube channel has been deleted so I can’t link to it) that this wasn’t organic, and that Yang was clearly getting a “boost” from somewhere. Wallace was certainly correct about that. It was clearly a coordinated, professional op, but by whom? I have some ideas about who was directing it and what the reasons were, but it doesn’t matter. It’s all speculation. It’s also hard to tell to what extent anything that originates from places like 4chan is even real anymore, or to what extent it ever was. That wasn’t Yang’s fault though. Many of his policies were good. If nothing else, $1000 a month is $1000 a month. Nothing else mattered. Yang’s candidacy was propelled in essentially a “pump and dump” scheme, similar to those used in the seedy world of pinksheets and penny stocks promotion. With that thought, how appropriate the “pink hats” were.

None of that was Yang’s fault though. He of course made a strategic error in failing to embrace his new “supporters” and capitalize on the momentum which was gifted to him by the powers that be. Many people were disappointed by this and quickly abandoned the yacht. Part of me found it kind of admirable though that Yang insisted on being true to himself, “math” and all, rather than latch onto some fleeting, trendy meme campaign and pretend to be an obnoxious shitlord.

Yang did make some real blunders though. His first error was the idea to announce some new policy everyday (can’t remember if it was for 30 days or 60 days.) Many of these proposals seemed to have just been pulled out of his ass or a result of poor advice. Things such as “lowering the voting age to 16” were totally unnecessary and alienated a lot of potential supporters. He failed to take his own advice and “focus on the money.” His big selling point was the $1000 per month. That is all he should have been talking about with the exception of a few other common sense stances on important issues of the day to show he was a serious, well-rounded candidate. Yang’s other serious error was in his over the top pandering to SJWs and Russia conspiracy airheads. There is no way that someone as smart as Yang really buys into all that nonsense. The same criticism I applied to Trump years ago, applies to Yang. Intelligent candidates are at their best when they boldly articulate what they believe in their hearts rather than tell people they think (or have been advised) voters want to hear. Even if it seems unpopular or like a bad move politically, you have to just take the heat and press forward, confident that you will be vindicated. Lead the people where you want them to go.

Finally, I didn’t watch the debates, but from every indication, Yang’s performance was a disaster. He squandered what little airtime he received to make statements like “Russia is hacking our democracy.” Yang clearly does not understand where his potential pool of support lies. There was a niche available to him which he has been too clueless to recognize and exploit. Look, I like Yang. I wrote 3 lengthy essays and made a youtube video expressing enthusiastic (by my standards anyway) support for him. There’s still a long way to go in the election. If he’s really good at math, maybe he can learn from his mistakes like a sophisticated computer. At this point though, I don’t believe Yang has what it takes. $YANG stock has tanked. Don’t be left holding this bag.

Yangster’s Paradise

“That’s cool, but he has no chance,” was my initial reaction when a friend of mine sent me a link to a story about a candidate who was running for president on a platform of “universal basic income.” Admittedly, I had never heard of Andrew Yang until just a couple of weeks ago and had pretty much already made up my mind to support Tulsi Gabbard in 2020 (though with Bernie now entering the race, her chances have been greatly diminished.) I must say that I feel a tad guilty for dismissing Yang out of hand, since even a brief glimpse of his campaign reveals Yang to be the smartest, most impressive and dare I say, the most serious candidate in this race.

While the other candidates spout vague, meaningless buzzword driven platitudes about “hate,” “privilege” “Russia” and engage in unproductive political theatrics, Yang offers up detailed policy proposals which actually address the most pressing issues of our time. Andrew Yang’s optimistic and solutions oriented approach provides a stark contrast with the rest of the candidates, whose political identities have largely been reduced to perpetual outrage at everything Trump says and does (even in the cases where Trump has embraced traditionally democratic positions, such as peace with North Korea, fair trade etc.)

Yang wisely has chosen to bypass the culture wars almost entirely and instead is focused on crafting complex solutions to actual problems. Rather than pandering to various “marginalized” identity groups, he looks at the bigger picture and remains committed to ideas which can improve the lives of everyone. The other candidates pay only superficial lip service to the issues we face, to the extent they have even thought about them at all. Yang has delved into the nitty-gritty of policy. I’m not even just talking about his “Universal Basic Income” proposal. Just take a gander at the treasure trove of policies presented on his website. This guy has thought of everything. He actually has a real plan. If even 1/3 of Yang’s ideas were implemented, the USA would be a vastly improved country. No other candidate has given any serious thought to the everyday issues that matter to Americans. Just the fact that Yang is promising to ban robocalls would be reason enough to vote for him. Yang’s American Mall Act would help to revitalize, repurpose and preserve many of these culturally important structures.

I like Yang because he combines social liberalism with forward-thinking, transhumanist friendly ideas and bold economic policies, all without succumbing to seemingly obligatory, anti-white racial grievance politics. While the rest of the candidates fall over each other to signal their open hostility toward white people (or some similarly maligned bogeyman) Yang emerges as a genuinely positive force, armed with concrete proposals and determined to make life better for everyone.

Conventional wisdom states that relatively unknown candidates run for office with the aim of getting publicity for their ideas, to draw attention to certain issues and get people talking about them. We live in unconventional times though, when obscure candidates can be memed into political juggernauts overnight. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Beto O’Rourke and even David Hogg were complete “nobodies” a year or two ago and now find their influence inflated beyond that of household name politicians who’ve been in office for decades. It may seem like a long shot, but Yang can win. His upbeat, affable persona and substantive campaign have the potential to transcend traditional ideological divides and win over vast swaths of the American public. If even the most disillusioned among us can manage to muster up sufficient enthusiasm for Yang’s candidacy, then imagine what people who actually do things could do for him. Andrew Yang for president, for the win.