Pinksheet Yang

A couple of months ago, when an avalanche of Yang memes seemed to appear out of nowhere, Hunter Wallace pointed out (his youtube channel has been deleted so I can’t link to it) that this wasn’t organic, and that Yang was clearly getting a “boost” from somewhere. Wallace was certainly correct about that. It was clearly a coordinated, professional op, but by whom? I have some ideas about who was directing it and what the reasons were, but it doesn’t matter. It’s all speculation. It’s also hard to tell to what extent anything that originates from places like 4chan is even real anymore, or to what extent it ever was. That wasn’t Yang’s fault though. Many of his policies were good. If nothing else, $1000 a month is $1000 a month. Nothing else mattered. Yang’s candidacy was propelled in essentially a “pump and dump” scheme, similar to those used in the seedy world of pinksheets and penny stocks promotion. With that thought, how appropriate the “pink hats” were.

None of that was Yang’s fault though. He of course made a strategic error in failing to embrace his new “supporters” and capitalize on the momentum which was gifted to him by the powers that be. Many people were disappointed by this and quickly abandoned the yacht. Part of me found it kind of admirable though that Yang insisted on being true to himself, “math” and all, rather than latch onto some fleeting, trendy meme campaign and pretend to be an obnoxious shitlord.

Yang did make some real blunders though. His first error was the idea to announce some new policy everyday (can’t remember if it was for 30 days or 60 days.) Many of these proposals seemed to have just been pulled out of his ass or a result of poor advice. Things such as “lowering the voting age to 16” were totally unnecessary and alienated a lot of potential supporters. He failed to take his own advice and “focus on the money.” His big selling point was the $1000 per month. That is all he should have been talking about with the exception of a few other common sense stances on important issues of the day to show he was a serious, well-rounded candidate. Yang’s other serious error was in his over the top pandering to SJWs and Russia conspiracy airheads. There is no way that someone as smart as Yang really buys into all that nonsense. The same criticism I applied to Trump years ago, applies to Yang. Intelligent candidates are at their best when they boldly articulate what they believe in their hearts rather than tell people they think (or have been advised) voters want to hear. Even if it seems unpopular or like a bad move politically, you have to just take the heat and press forward, confident that you will be vindicated. Lead the people where you want them to go.

Finally, I didn’t watch the debates, but from every indication, Yang’s performance was a disaster. He squandered what little airtime he received to make statements like “Russia is hacking our democracy.” Yang clearly does not understand where his potential pool of support lies. There was a niche available to him which he has been too clueless to recognize and exploit. Look, I like Yang. I wrote 3 lengthy essays and made a youtube video expressing enthusiastic (by my standards anyway) support for him. There’s still a long way to go in the election. If he’s really good at math, maybe he can learn from his mistakes like a sophisticated computer. At this point though, I don’t believe Yang has what it takes. $YANG stock has tanked. Don’t be left holding this bag.

YangGang and the “Jumping In” of Andrew Yang

A fundamental problem of our time is the exploitation of people’s inability to comprehend language. I don’t mean in the sense of “people can’t speak English” or anything like that. Words like “discouraged” are now misinterpreted as “banned.” “It’s okay to be white” is labeled “white supremacy.” Terms and phrases are arbitrarily redefined on the fly to fit whatever narrative or line of attack is most convenient. While this phenomenon is by no means unique to the era we live in, the amplifying ability of social media allows slander and misinformation to proliferate in a short period of time.. The mischaracterizations reach millions of people, and by the time they can be countered or debunked, the damage is already done. They’ve been mythologized into the public consciousness.

Andrew Yang is getting a taste of just how dishonestly and opportunistically people’s views get misrepresented in the current year. In many cases pundits / opponents just outright lie when they mischaracterize someone’s beliefs, while other instances can simply be chalked up to poor comprehension, omitted context, etc…to equal effect but with benign intention.

The most recent example of Yang running into this has been regarding his position on circumcision. It’s pretty simple. Yang said he would discourage the practice. He thinks parents should have a choice and be informed that it isn’t medically necessary. Notice how people twisted that into “This guy wants to effectively ban Islam and Judaism.” Totally bogus insinuation. There was nothing at all controversial in Yang’s statements about the issue.

Another instance was when he predicted whites would shoot up churches. Yang’s timing could not have been more “perfect.” Not only did this prediction eerily come true (the New Zealand shooting occurred on the same day Yang was defending his statements on this very issue,) but Yang’s broader point was to illustrate why it’s important to treat whites fairly as they become a minority and offer them an incentive to have a share in the future. Taken in their entirety, Yang’s comments clearly were not attempting to denigrate whites but to promote empathy and understanding.

I’ve also seen a number of people refer to Yang as being “anti-robot,” due to his emphasis on how automation will impact jobs. Far from being a Luddite, Yang is a futurist who surely supports advancements in robotics, automation and artificial intelligence. It’s just that he believes the humans workers displaced by automation should reap some of the benefits of these increases in labor efficiency. Everyone wins. The companies get the increased productivity from automation, and the former employees get a shorter work week and a cash dividend on the backend. The American revolutionaries used the slogan “No taxation without representation!” Yang’s variant might well be “No automation without compensation.” Similarly, with his proposal to demand social media companies give users a percentage of the money they get for collecting and selling users’ personal data, an apt rallying cry might be “No data extraction without a piece of the action!”

Yang is essentially being “jumped in” to the dissident political arena. These early, absurd distortions of his positions should serve to toughen him up and provide an eye-opening experience. If he realizes how easily his views can be grossly mischaracterized in this way, perhaps he might question his assumptions about the views and intentions of some of his more contemptible, “unpersoned” supporters. This is my third article promoting Yang for president. One might say that given some of the (mildly) controversial things I’ve written in the past, people like me aren’t welcome in the campaign. Well, that’s too bad. Yang is going to have a broad base of support whether he likes it or not. As long as we can remember this is about unifying people toward a common goal, there’s room on the Yang Yacht for everyone. Crack open a cold one, and set a course for bag island.

Brandon Adamson is the author of Skytrain to Nowhere and several other books of poetry.